Saturday, July 22, 2017

Saturday Serendipity (July 22, 2017)


Here are a few recommendations for your weekend reading.

1.  Readers of this blog know that like many other users of the Family Tree Maker (FTM) genealogy application, I have been awaiting the long-delayed release of the new Software MacKiev FTM 2017.  This week MacKiev posted three updates including its "Final Update" of July 18.  MacKiev notes that all emails have been sent to the pre-purchasers and waiting purchasers of FTM 2017.  As part of the final update MacKiev stated, "[W]hile the circumstances that prompted these reports were not what we would have wished for, we’re glad we had this opportunity to share our thoughts with you. To show you more than we would have otherwise about how we work. About our stubborn dedication to get it right. And about our delight at the FTM community’s encouragement to do just that. So we won't say goodbye. Just so long for now. And stay tuned." You can read all of tis week's updates here.

Having waited somewhat patiently for the final release of FTM 2017, I must say that I download my prepaid copy today and the download was easy, smooth, and without any installation problems. The syncing of my Ancestry trees was also easy and smooth so far.  The first hour of use was without any major bumps, but I am tracking a few possible suggestions for the future.  At this point I have to state that the wait appears to have been worth it and that MacKiev went to great pains to make sure the role out and functionality would be s easy and smooth as possible!   

2.  The General Society of Mayflower Descendants (GSMD) and the New England Historical Genealogical Society (NEHGS) have just announced the launch of a new database to bring the authenticated five-generation Mayflower genealogies (known as the "Silver Books") in searchable form to a computer near you!  The first release will include genealogies of eight Mayflower passengers: James Chilton; Richard More; Francis Eaton; Edward Fuller; Samuel Fuller; John Howland; Degory Priest; and Edward Winslow. You can read more about the joint project and the new searchable online database here. This is yet another good reason to join NEHGS if you have not already done so!    

3.  If you have seen the Civil War movie "Glory," then you will recall that the commander of the heroic, first all-black regiment was Col. Robert Gould Shaw of Boston, Massachusetts. Col. Shaw was killed during the 1863 assault on Fort Wagner in South Carolina.  As he led the charge, he carried in his hand a British-made sword. That sword has now been donated to the Massachusetts Historical Society and will be displayed there. Red more about the sword and the donation here.       
        
4.  The Weekly Genealogist of NEHGS noted an interesting article this week about the accents of Colonial Americans. Did the residents of colonial America sound like their counterparts in Great Britain or not? Find out by reading "When Did Colonial America Gain Linguistic Independence" here.     
     
5.  Marian B. Wood of Climbing My Family Tree blog has a very useful post this week about a good way to caption family photos with context and location as well as the usual people identification and date.  Read this interesting post here.         
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Copyright 2017, John D. Tew
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Saturday, July 1, 2017

Saturday Serendipity (July 1, 2017)


Here are a few recommendations for your weekend reading.

1.  Diane L. Richard of UpFront With NGS blog is reprising older posts this summer to revisit some of her favorite genealogy-related resources. The reprised post this week was from a piece originally published on June 27, 2014 and it deals with a source for death indexes and records. Go here to learn more about Joe Beine's Online Searchable Death Indexes & Records and to get a link to the site.     

2.   For those who are not members of NEHGS (New England Historic Genealogical Society), give the NEHGS databases a whirl FOR FREE during the June 29th through midnight (EDT) Thursday, July 6th free roaming period. All you need do is enter a "guest registration" and search away! Here is your link to American Ancestors where you can become a guest and get started.

3.  Here is an interesting article in The Atlantic that was recommended in this week's Weekly Genealogy newsletter from NEHGS. Read how the combination of state cancer registry data and Mormon genealogy records led to confirmation of a genetic cause for colon cancer as well as mutations for cardiac arrhythmia and melanoma.   
        
4.  James Tanner of Genealogy's Star blog posted Part I of a series on "levels of backup and storage" for genealogists. Read this useful and informative post here and return for further parts as they become available.   
     
5.  The maternal line of my wife Molly is from Canada and because the summer of Molly's birth was so brutally hot, her mother ventured north to Ontario for cooler weather and some time at her family's cottage on Lake Simcoe .  .  . and thus Molly was born in Toronto. Marian Wood of Climbing My Family tree blog posted today about her Canadian experience in attending Expo 67 in Montreal as part of her recognition of Canada Day (July 1st). This reminded me that not only is today Canada Day (much like our 4th of July), it is the 150th anniversary of that holiday celebration. Read Marian's post here and wish all your Canadian family and friends a very HAPPY CANADA DAY!   
    
6.  And finally, if you ever wondered what a wealthy woman in the 1700s actually wore when getting dressed -- and how long it would take each day (with assistance) to get dressed in all the layers you will learn were actually worn -- have a look at this 7 and a half minute video by the National Museums Liverpool to find the answers. 
         
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Copyright 2017, John D. Tew
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